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USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) (originally Albany)

USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) (originally Albany)


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USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) (originally Albany)

USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) was a Baltimore class heavy cruiser that was completed in time to take part in the attacks on Iwo Jima, Okinawa and the Japanese Home Islands and that served in the Atlantic and Mediterranean during the Korean War. Pittsburgh received 2 battle stars for World War II service.

CA-72 was laid down on 3 February 1943 as USS Albany. She was renamed Pittsburgh after the original Pittsburg(CA-70) was renamed Canberra to honour HMAS Canberra. She was launched on 22 February 1944 and commissioned on 10 October 1944.

The Pittsburgh left for the Pacific in January 1945 and joined TF 58 at Ulithi on 13 February. She was allocated to TG 58.2, which was built around the carrier Lexington (CV-16). Her first combat sortie came a few days later when the task force put to sea in support of the invasion of Iwo Jima. The carrier aircraft hit targets near Tokyo on 16-17 February. On 19 February they attacked Japanese targets on Iwo Jima itself before returning to Tokyo on 25 February and the Ryukyu Islands (or Nansei Shoto) on 1 March.

After a brief period of rest at Ulithi the fleet sailed again on 14 March. Kyushu was the target on 18-19 March, but this time the Japanese response was effective. The carrier Franklin (CV-13) was hit, set on fire and lost power. The Pittsburgh picked up 34 of her men from the sea, the managed to get a tow line onto the carrier. Pittsburghtowed the carrier away from Japan until noon on 20 March, fighting off two Japanese air attacks on the way. After that the carrier had regained enough power to make her own way to safety.

The Pittsburgh's last two sorties of the Second World War were both in support of the invasion of Okinawa. The first lasted from 23 March to 27 April and saw the carriers attack Japanese airfields within range of Okinawa, as well as providing direct support for the troops.

The second sortie began on 8 May, and saw a similar mix of operations. On 4 June the Pittsburgh was hit by a typhoon and early on 5 June the storm wrenched the front of the bow (as far back as the forward 8in turret) off the ship! Nobody was lost in this incident, but it needed skilful sailing to save the ship. The forward bulkhead had to be reinforced to keep the water out of the rest of the ship, and after the storm was over the ship began a long voyage to Guam. She couldn't risk travelling above 6 knots, so she didn't reach Guam until 10 June. Remarkable the bow also stayed afloat, was salvaged, and reached Guam!

The Pittsburgh was given a temporary bow and returned to the United States for full repairs. These weren't completed until September 1945. The Pittsburgh was placed in the reserve on 12 March 1946 and decommissioned on 7 March 1947.

During the Korean War a large number of decommissioned warships were brought back into the fleet. Pittsburghwas recommissioned on 25 September 1951, but despite having been based on the west coast while in the reserve she was sent to join the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean. This first tour was brief, lasting from 11 February to 20 May 1952. She then served with the Atlantic Fleet for a spell, before returning to the Mediterranean from December 1952 to May 1953. During this period she served as the flagship of Vice Admiral Jerauld P. Wright, Commander in Chief, Naval Forces Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean during a goodwill tour of the Indian Ocean. Her third and final tour with the 6th Fleet lasted from 19 January to 26 May 1954.

Her final spell of operational duty came in the Pacific. She reached Yokosuka on 26 November and joined the 7th Fleet. She helped protect the Chinese Nationalist evacuation of the Tachen Islands, before returning to the US early in 1955. She entered the reserve on 28 April 1956, was decommissioned on 28 August 1956 and struck off the Navy List in 1973.

Displacement (standard)

14,472t

Displacement (loaded)

17,031t

Top Speed

33kts

Range

10,000nm at 15kts

Armour – belt

4-6in

- armour deck

2.5in

- barbettes

6.3in

- turrets

8in face
3in roof
2-3.75in sides
1.5 rear

- conning tower

6in
3in roof

- underwater magazines

3in side
2.5in deck

Length

673ft 5in oa

Armaments

Nine 8in guns (three triple turrets)
Twelve 5in/38 guns (six double positions)
Forty eight 40mm guns (11x4, 2x2)
Twenty four 20mm guns
Four aircraft

Crew complement

2039

Laid down

3 February 1943

Launched

22 February 1944

Completed

10 October 1944

Stricken

1 July 1973


USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) (originally Albany) - History

Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite announced Jan. 15 that the Navy will name three future vessels after ships steeped in naval history and two others after a after a Medal of Honor recipient and a Native American tribe.

Braithwaite detailed the announcement Jan. 8 during a visit to one of the Navy’s first heavy frigates and oldest commissioned ship afloat – USS Constitution.

“The decks and lines of this proud ship speak to our storied past, and the Sailors who operate her reveal the strength of our future,” said Braithwaite. “We must always look to our wake to help chart our future course. Together, these future ships will strengthen our Navy and carry on our sacred mission to secure the sea lanes, stand by our allies, and protect our nation against all adversaries.”

The future ships will bear the names and hull numbers:
USS Chesapeake (FFG 64)
USS Silversides (SSN 807)
USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31)
USNS Lenni Lenape (T-ATS 9)
USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7)

(Courtesy image)

The future Constellation-class frigate USS Chesapeake (FFG 64) will be named for one of the first six Navy frigates authorized by the Naval Act of 1794. The first USS Chesapeake served with honor against the Barbary Pirates in the early 1800. Following an at-sea battle with HMS Shannon in 1813, the ship was captured by the Royal Navy and commissioned her HMS Chesapeake. Braithwaite recently travelled to England where he retrieved a piece of the original frigate from the Chesapeake Mill in Hampshire.

“Like Constitution and Constellation, the first Chesapeake was a mighty sailing ship that declared our nation a maritime power,” said Braithwaite. “The new USS Chesapeake, FFG-64, will proudly carry on the legacy of that name into the new era of great power competition.”

Last year, Braithwaite named future Constellation-class frigates USS Constellation (FFG 62) and USS Congress (FFG 63) to honor the first six heavy frigates.

To honor the Silent Service, the future Virginia-class attack submarine USS Silversides (SSN 807) will carry the name of a World War II Gato-class submarine. The first Silversides (SS 236) completed 14 tours beneath the Pacific Ocean spanning the entire length of World War II. She inflicted heavy damage on enemy shipping, saved downed aviators, and even drew enemy fire to protect a fellow submarine. A second Silversides (SSN 679) was a Sturgeon-class submarine that served during the Cold War. This will be the third naval vessel to carry the name Silversides. The name comes from a small fish marked with a silvery stripe along each side of its body.

(Courtesy image)

“Those who run silent and deep in this new attack submarine will inherit a proud legacy, and the capabilities to forge a strong future for our nation and our allies,” said Braithwaite.

The future San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31) will be the fifth Navy vessel to bear the name. The first was an ironclad gunboat that served during the American Civil War.
The second USS Pittsburgh (CA 4) was an armored cruiser that served during World War I, and a third USS Pittsburgh (CA 72) was a Baltimore-class cruiser that served during World War II – supporting the landing at Iwo Jima. The fourth USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) was a Los Angeles-class submarine that served the Navy from December 1984 to August 2019.

To honor the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania, a future Navajo-class towing, salvage, and rescue ship will be named USNS Lenni Lenape (T-ATS 9). This will be the first naval vessel to carry the name of the Lenni Lenape tribe who are indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands, and the first tribe to sign a treaty with the United States in 1778.

“As a resident of the Keystone State, I know that Pittsburgh is a proud city with a strong legacy of service. I am confident that the crew of the future Pittsburgh will demonstrate the same excellence in support of amphibious and littoral operations around the world,” said Braithwaite. “And, the future USS Lenni Lenape will carry the legacy of the Lenape people for generations to come.

(Courtesy image)

The future USNS Lenni Lenape will join USNS Muscogee Creek Nation (T-ATS 10), USNS Navajo (T-ATS 6), USNS Cherokee Nation (T-ATS 7), and USNS Saginaw Ojibwe Anishinabek (T-ATS 8) providing a wide range of missions including open ocean towing, oil spill response, humanitarian assistance and wide area search and surveillance.

Also joining the fleet will be the first Expeditionary Sea Base USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7), carrying the name of Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipient Private First Class Robert Ernest Simanek who earned the nation’s highest medal for valor for his actions during the Korean War when he unhesitatingly threw himself on a deadly missile to shield his fellow Marines from serious injury or death.

“Private Simanek stands in the unbroken line of heroes extending from the early Marines who once stood in the fighting tops of our original frigates, to the Marines holding the line around the world today, and those who will deploy from the future USS Robert Simanek for years to come,” said Braithwaite. “This Expeditionary Sea Base continues the honored legacy of warriors from the sea, exemplified by her namesake.”

Simanek, a Detroit, Mich., native, joined the Marine Corps in August 1951. He was just 22 years old when he sailed for Korea, joining Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines in May 1952 to serve as a rifleman and as a radioman when needed. In addition to the Medal of Honor and Purple Heart, he was also awarded the Korean Service Medal with two bronze stars. Simanek, now 90, lives in Farmington Hills, Mich.

(Courtesy image)

Along with the ship names, Braithwaite also selected individuals who will be recognized as sponsors for several ships he recently named. The sponsor plays an important role in the life of each ship and is typically selected because of a relationship to the namesake or to the ship’s current mission. The following individuals were identified as sponsors:

Melissa Braithwaite will sponsor the future USS Constellation (FFG 62).
Barbara Strasser will sponsor the future USS Chesapeake (FFG 64).
Gail Fritsch will sponsor the future USS Barb (SSN 804).
Mimi Donnelly will sponsor the future USS Tang (SSN 805).
Michelle Rogeness will sponsor the future USS Wahoo (SSN 806).
Cindy Foggo will sponsor the future USS Silversides (SSN 807).
Kelly Geurts will sponsor the future USS Wisconsin (SSBN-827).
Nancy Urban will sponsor the future USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31).


Korean War

In 1951, the Pittsburgh was reactivated to strengthen the fleet , which was heavily involved in the Korean War . First, however, there were two trips to the Mediterranean by 1953. This was followed by an overhaul and another trip in the Mediterranean in 1954. In the fall she was relocated to the Pacific. In November she reached Yokosuka , from where she took part in exercises and eventually accompanied the evacuation of the national Chinese from the Dachen Islands . On August 28, 1956, it was assigned to the reserve fleet, in which it remained until 1973, when it was sold and dismantled.


ALBANY CG 10

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.


    Oregon City Class Heavy Cruiser
    Keel Laid 6 March 1944 - Launched 30 June 1945

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Albany (5020


Built at SII-Shipyards on Balmung and finished at Arsenal IV , christened in 5019, this behemoth of Union might feature the latest in weapon and defense technology. No other known ship class in the galaxy can take the same pounding and dish out as much destruction as a Union Battleship. No other known species build anything quite like it.

The USS Albany is the flagship of the 19th fleet and is traditionally assigned to the RED Battle Group Cluster First BG.

Union Battleships are also fully equipped with science labs, science crews and extensive med facilities to perform a wide spectrum of missions.

Even though the Union Fleet has designated Fighter Carriers, Battleships carry large fleets of auxiliary crafts with them.

Standard Crew Compliment: 34,000 + 3,500 Marines and 2,500 Auxillary craft crews and pilots.

56 x Translocator Giga load -Dual

23 x TL Sniper Cannons - 1/2 Ly RW - Kilo Load

30 x FTL DE- Projectors 35,000 Terrawatt ea

Plus other weapons of smaller size, point defense cannons, Disintegrators, Plasma Guns, Graviton Cannons, Paralysators and Tech Stop. Planetary Bomb Shafts, Minelaying capability, 400 Wolfcraft Fighters, Thor Gun Boats, 4 Barracuda Destroyers.


USS Albany (1846), a 22-gun sloop-of-war commissioned in 1846 and lost at sea in 1854.
USS Albany (1869), a 14-gun screw sloop-of-war commissioned as USS Contoocook in 1868, renamed Albany in 1869, and decommissioned in 1870
USS Albany (CL-23), a protected cruiser, later reclassified as a light cruiser, in commission from 1900 to 1904, from 1907 to 1913, in 1914, and from 1916 to 1922
USS Albany (CA-72), a heavy cruiser renamed USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) in 1942 prior to the beginning of construction
USS Albany (CA-123), a heavy cruiser in commission from 1946 to 1958, converted to a guided missile cruiser and redesignated USS Albany (CG-10), and then in commission again from 1962 to 1967 and from 1968 to 1980
USS Albany (SSN-753), a Los Angeles-class attack submarine commissioned in 1990 and still in active service


Contents

World War II, 1944 – 1945

Pittsburgh worked up along the east coast and in the Caribbean before departing from Boston, Massachusetts on 13 January 1945 for duty in the Pacific theatre of operations. After calling at Panama and final gunnery exercises around the Hawaiian Islands, she was assigned to Fast Carrier Task Force 58 (TF   58) at Ulithi, built around the aircraft carrier USS Lexington on the 13 February.

Iwo Jima

The force sailed on the 10 February for the assault on Iwo Jima, conducting carrier airstrikes against airfields near Tokyo on 16 and 17 February which restricted the Japanese air response to the initial landings on 19 February. Further strikes against Tokyo on 25 February and Ryukyu Islands on 1 March complemented these actions.

The task force sailed from Ulithi on 14 March to shell airfields and other military installations on Kyūshū on 18 and 19 of March. The next day, a Japanese aircraft hit the aircraft carrier USS Franklin with two 250kg bombs, setting the fuelled and armed aircraft on her flight deck on fire and she lost all power. Pittsburgh came alongside and rescued 34 men from the water and with the light cruiser Santa Fe, managed to get a tow line on board the carrier to begin the task of towing the carrier. The cruiser continued her effort until midday on the 20 March when Franklin was able to cast off the tow and proceed under her own power. Capt. Gingrich remained on the bridge for 48 hours during this time.

Okinawa

Between 23 March and 27 April, Pittsburgh guarded the carriers as they first prepared, covered and supported, the invasion of Okinawa. Enemy airfields were interdicted, and the troops given close air support by the carriers. Pittsburgh helped repelled enemy air attacks and launched her scout planes to rescue downed pilots. After replenishing at Ulithi, the force sailed on 8 May to attack the Ryukyu Islands and Southern Japan.

Damaged by a typhoon

On 4 June, Pittsburgh was caught in a Typhoon Viper [1] which increased to 70-knot (130   km/h) winds and 100-foot (30   m) waves. Shortly after her starboard scout plane had been lifted off its catapult and dashed onto the deck by the wind, Pittsburgh ' s second deck buckled, her bow was thrust upward, and then sheared off, although there were no casualties. Still fighting the storm, and manoeuvring to avoid being hit by her drifting bow structure, Pittsburgh was held quarter-on to the seas by her engine power while the forward bulkhead was shored. After a seven-hour battle, the storm subsided, and Pittsburgh proceeded at 6 knots (11   km/h) to Guam, arriving on 10 June. Her bow, nicknamed "McKeesport" (a suburb of Pittsburgh), was later salvaged by the tugboat USS Munsee and brought into Guam. The 104-foot section of bow broke off owing to poor plate welds at the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Co. at the Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts. The typhoon damage also earned her the nickname "Longest Ship in the World" as thousands of miles separated the bow and stern.

With a false bow, Pittsburgh left Guam on 24 June for Puget Sound Navy Yard, arriving 16 July. Still under repair at war's end, she was placed in reserve on 12 March 1946 and decommissioned on 7 March 1947.

Atlantic and Mediterranean, 1951 – 1954

As the Korean War called for a major restoration of US naval strength, Pittsburgh was recommissioned on 25 September 1951, with Capt. Preston V. Mercer in command. She sailed on 20 October for the Panama Canal, worked up out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and prepared at Norfolk, Virginia for a tour of duty with the 6th Fleet sailing on 11 February 1952. Returning on 20 May, she joined in the Atlantic Fleet's schedule of exercises and special operations in the western Atlantic and Caribbean. At this time her captain was P D Gallery.

During her second Mediterranean tour of duty, sailing on 1 December, she flew the flag of Vice Admiral Jerauld Wright, Commander in Chief, Naval Forces Eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean for a good-will cruise to the Indian Ocean in January 1953. She returned to Norfolk in May for a major modernization overhaul, before rejoined the 6th Fleet at Gibraltar on 19 January 1954. Once again she carried Admiral Wright to ports of the Indian Ocean, returning to Norfolk on 26 May. During the summer of 1954, she engaged in further operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean. On 29 July 1954, Pittsburgh collided with another ship while sailing in the Saint Lawrence River. Damage to the hull was above the waterline and the holes were repaired.

Pacific, 1954 – 1956

On 21 October 1954, she passed through the Panama Canal to join the Pacific Fleet, with Long Beach as her home port. She sailed for the Far East, calling at Pearl Harbor on 13 November and reaching Yokosuka on 26 November. She joined the 7th Fleet helping to cover the Chinese Nationalist defense of the Dachen Islands and evacuation of civilians and non-essential military personnel. Leaving Japan on 16 February 1955, she resumed west coast before reporting to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 28 October to be deactivated.

Decommissioning and sale, 1956 – 1974

Pittsburgh went into reserve on 28 April 1956, and was decommissioned at Bremerton on 28 August 1956. The ship remained there until stricken on 1 July 1973 and sold for scrap on 1 August 1974, to the Zidell Explorations Corp., Portland, Oregon. An anchor from USS Pittsburgh is on display in front of the Children's Museum, Allegheny Center, Pittsburgh, PA. and the ship's bell is on display in front of Pittsburgh's Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall and Museum.


References [ edit | edit source ]

  1. ↑"Gulf War: April 1991."US Navy.
  2. ↑"Sub commander relieved of duty after woman alleges he faked death to end affair."The Day Publishing Company, 12 August 2012.
  3. ↑ Black, Jeff. "Report: Ex-Navy sub commander Michael Ward II faked death to get out of affair with Virginia woman."NBC News, 13 August 2012.

This article includes information collected from the public domain sources Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships and Naval Vessel Register.


SECNAV Names Future Vessels while aboard Historic Navy Ship

The Navy will name three future vessels after ships steeped in naval history and two others after a after a Medal of Honor recipient and a Native American tribe.

Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite announced Jan. 15 that the Navy will name three future vessels after ships steeped in naval history and two others after a after a Medal of Honor recipient and a Native American tribe.

Braithwaite detailed the announcement Jan. 8 during a visit to one of the Navy's first heavy frigates and oldest commissioned ship afloat – USS Constitution.

"The decks and lines of this proud ship speak to our storied past, and the Sailors who operate her reveal the strength of our future," said Braithwaite. "We must always look to our wake to help chart our future course. Together, these future ships will strengthen our Navy and carry on our sacred mission to secure the sea lanes, stand by our allies, and protect our nation against all adversaries."

The future ships will bear the names and hull numbers:

USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7)

The future Constellation-class frigate USS Chesapeake (FFG 64) will be named for one of the first six Navy frigates authorized by the Naval Act of 1794. The first USS Chesapeake served with honor against the Barbary Pirates in the early 1800. Following an at-sea battle with HMS Shannon in 1813, the ship was captured by the Royal Navy and commissioned her HMS Chesapeake. Braithwaite recently travelled to England where he retrieved a piece of the original frigate from the Chesapeake Mill in Hampshire.

"Like Constitution and Constellation, the first Chesapeake was a mighty sailing ship that declared our nation a maritime power," said Braithwaite. "The new USS Chesapeake, FFG-64, will proudly carry on the legacy of that name into the new era of great power competition."

Last year, Braithwaite named future Constellation-class frigates USS Constellation (FFG 62) and USS Congress (FFG 63) to honor the first six heavy frigates.

To honor the Silent Service, the future Virginia-class attack submarine USS Silversides (SSN 807) will carry the name of a WWII Gato-class submarine. The first Silversides (SS 236) completed 14 tours beneath the Pacific Ocean spanning the entire length of WWII. She inflicted heavy damage on enemy shipping, saved downed aviators, and even drew enemy fire to protect a fellow submarine. A second Silversides (SSN 679) was a Sturgeon-class submarine that served during the Cold War. This will be the third naval vessel to carry the name Silversides. The name comes from a small fish marked with a silvery stripe along each side of its body.

"Those who run silent and deep in this new attack submarine will inherit a proud legacy, and the capabilities to forge a strong future for our nation and our allies," said Braithwaite.

The future San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31) will be the fifth Navy vessel to bear the name. The first was an ironclad gunboat that served during the American Civil War. The second USS Pittsburgh (CA 4) was an armored cruiser that served during WWI, and a third USS Pittsburgh (CA 72) was a Baltimore-class cruiser that served during WWII – supporting the landing at Iwo Jima. The fourth USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) was a Los Angeles-class submarine that served the Navy from December 1984 to August 2019.

To honor the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania, a future Navajo-class towing, salvage, and rescue ship will be named USNS Lenni Lenape (T-ATS 9). This will be the first naval vessel to carry the name of the Lenni Lenape tribe who are indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands, and the first tribe to sign a treaty with the United States in 1778.

"As a resident of the Keystone State, I know that Pittsburgh is a proud city with a strong legacy of service. I am confident that the crew of the future Pittsburgh will demonstrate the same excellence in support of amphibious and littoral operations around the world," said Braithwaite. "And, the future USS Lenni Lenape will carry the legacy of the Lenape people for generations to come.

The future USNS Lenni Lenape will join USNS Muscogee Creek Nation (T-ATS 10), USNS Navajo (T-ATS 6), USNS Cherokee Nation (T-ATS 7), and USNS Saginaw Ojibwe Anishinabek (T-ATS 8) providing a wide range of missions including open ocean towing, oil spill response, humanitarian assistance and wide area search and surveillance.

Also joining the fleet will be the first Expeditionary Sea Base USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7), carrying the name of Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipient Private First Class Robert Ernest Simanek who earned the nation's highest medal for valor for his actions during the Korean War when he unhesitatingly threw himself on a deadly missile to shield his fellow Marines from serious injury or death.

"Private Simanek stands in the unbroken line of heroes extending from the early Marines who once stood in the fighting tops of our original frigates, to the Marines holding the line around the world today, and those who will deploy from the future USS Robert Simanek for years to come," said Braithwaite. "This Expeditionary Sea Base continues the honored legacy of warriors from the sea, exemplified by her namesake."

Simanek, a Detroit, Michigan, native, joined the Marine Corps in August 1951. He was just 22 years old when he sailed for Korea, joining Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines in May 1952 to serve as a rifleman and as a radioman when needed. In addition to the Medal of Honor and Purple Heart, he was also awarded the Korean Service Medal with two bronze stars. Simanek, now 90, lives in Farmington Hills, Michigan.

Along with the ship names, Braithwaite also selected individuals who will be recognized as sponsors for several ships he recently named. The sponsor plays an important role in the life of each ship and is typically selected because of a relationship to the namesake or to the ship's current mission. The following individuals were identified as sponsors:


SECNAV Names Future Vessels while aboard Historic Navy Ship

WASHINGTON - Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite announced Jan. 15 that the Navy will name three future vessels after ships steeped in naval history and two others after a after a Medal of Honor recipient and a Native American tribe.

Braithwaite detailed the announcement Jan. 8 during a visit to one of the Navy’s first heavy frigates and oldest commissioned ship afloat – USS Constitution.

“The decks and lines of this proud ship speak to our storied past, and the Sailors who operate her reveal the strength of our future,” said Braithwaite. “We must always look to our wake to help chart our future course. Together, these future ships will strengthen our Navy and carry on our sacred mission to secure the sea lanes, stand by our allies, and protect our nation against all adversaries.”

The future ships will bear the names and hull numbers:
USS Chesapeake (FFG 64)
USS Silversides (SSN 807)
USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31)
USNS Lenni Lenape (T-ATS 9)
USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7)

The future Constellation-class frigate USS Chesapeake (FFG 64) will be named for one of the first six Navy frigates authorized by the Naval Act of 1794. The first USS Chesapeake served with honor against the Barbary Pirates in the early 1800. Following an at-sea battle with HMS Shannon in 1813, the ship was captured by the Royal Navy and commissioned her HMS Chesapeake. Braithwaite recently travelled to England where he retrieved a piece of the original frigate from the Chesapeake Mill in Hampshire.

“Like Constitution and Constellation, the first Chesapeake was a mighty sailing ship that declared our nation a maritime power,” said Braithwaite. “The new USS Chesapeake, FFG-64, will proudly carry on the legacy of that name into the new era of great power competition.”

Last year, Braithwaite named future Constellation-class frigates USS Constellation (FFG 62) and USS Congress (FFG 63) to honor the first six heavy frigates.

To honor the Silent Service, the future Virginia-class attack submarine USS Silversides (SSN 807) will carry the name of a WWII Gato-class submarine. The first Silversides (SS 236) completed 14 tours beneath the Pacific Ocean spanning the entire length of WWII. She inflicted heavy damage on enemy shipping, saved downed aviators, and even drew enemy fire to protect a fellow submarine. A second Silversides (SSN 679) was a Sturgeon-class submarine that served during the Cold War. This will be the third naval vessel to carry the name Silversides. The name comes from a small fish marked with a silvery stripe along each side of its body.

“Those who run silent and deep in this new attack submarine will inherit a proud legacy, and the capabilities to forge a strong future for our nation and our allies,” said Braithwaite.

The future San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31) will be the fifth Navy vessel to bear the name. The first was an ironclad gunboat that served during the American Civil War. The second USS Pittsburgh (CA 4) was an armored cruiser that served during WWI, and a third USS Pittsburgh (CA 72) was a Baltimore-class cruiser that served during WWII – supporting the landing at Iwo Jima. The fourth USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720) was a Los Angeles-class submarine that served the Navy from December 1984 to August 2019.

To honor the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania, a future Navajo-class towing, salvage, and rescue ship will be named USNS Lenni Lenape (T-ATS 9). This will be the first naval vessel to carry the name of the Lenni Lenape tribe who are indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands, and the first tribe to sign a treaty with the United States in 1778.

“As a resident of the Keystone State, I know that Pittsburgh is a proud city with a strong legacy of service. I am confident that the crew of the future Pittsburgh will demonstrate the same excellence in support of amphibious and littoral operations around the world,” said Braithwaite. “And, the future USS Lenni Lenape will carry the legacy of the Lenape people for generations to come.

The future USNS Lenni Lenape will join USNS Muscogee Creek Nation (T-ATS 10), USNS Navajo (T-ATS 6), USNS Cherokee Nation (T-ATS 7), and USNS Saginaw Ojibwe Anishinabek (T-ATS 8) providing a wide range of missions including open ocean towing, oil spill response, humanitarian assistance and wide area search and surveillance.

Also joining the fleet will be the first Expeditionary Sea Base USS Robert E. Simanek (ESB 7), carrying the name of Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipient Private First Class Robert Ernest Simanek who earned the nation’s highest medal for valor for his actions during the Korean War when he unhesitatingly threw himself on a deadly missile to shield his fellow Marines from serious injury or death.

“Private Simanek stands in the unbroken line of heroes extending from the early Marines who once stood in the fighting tops of our original frigates, to the Marines holding the line around the world today, and those who will deploy from the future USS Robert Simanek for years to come,” said Braithwaite. “This Expeditionary Sea Base continues the honored legacy of warriors from the sea, exemplified by her namesake.”

Simanek, a Detroit, Michigan, native, joined the Marine Corps in August 1951. He was just 22 years old when he sailed for Korea, joining Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines in May 1952 to serve as a rifleman and as a radioman when needed. In addition to the Medal of Honor and Purple Heart, he was also awarded the Korean Service Medal with two bronze stars. Simanek, now 90, lives in Farmington Hills, Michigan.

Along with the ship names, Braithwaite also selected individuals who will be recognized as sponsors for several ships he recently named. The sponsor plays an important role in the life of each ship and is typically selected because of a relationship to the namesake or to the ship’s current mission. The following individuals were identified as sponsors:

Melissa Braithwaite will sponsor the future USS Constellation (FFG 62).
Barbara Strasser will sponsor the future USS Chesapeake (FFG 64).
Gail Fritsch will sponsor the future USS Barb (SSN 804).
Mimi Donnelly will sponsor the future USS Tang (SSN 805).
Michelle Rogeness will sponsor the future USS Wahoo (SSN 806).
Cindy Foggo will sponsor the future USS Silversides (SSN 807).
Kelly Geurts will sponsor the future USS Wisconsin (SSBN-827).
Nancy Urban will sponsor the future USS Pittsburgh (LPD 31).


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USS Pittsburgh CA 72

Jan 12 - Jan 20 1945 WWI Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Pittsburgh CA 72 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Mostly Detailed Description of the Cruise
  • Some Ports of Call: Boston, Panama, Jamaica, Miami and New York.
  • Cruise Chart
  • Officer Crew Roster
  • Typical Weeks Schedule
  • Typical Plan of the Day
  • Daily New Report
  • The Ships Paper
  • Plus Much More

Over 10 Photos on Approximately 77 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Heavy Cruiser during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the USS Pittsburgh CA 72 (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

    Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these CD's have been very pleased with the product.

    Be sure to add us to your !

    Thanks for your Interest!


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    This CD is for your personal use only

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    Watch the video: USS Pittsburgh: Test Sail War Thunder Direct Hit Dev Server (May 2022).