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Wendell Phillips booed in Cincinnati

Wendell Phillips booed in Cincinnati



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On March 24, 1862, abolitionist orator Wendell Phillips is booed while attempting to give a lecture in Cincinnati, Ohio. The angry crowd was opposed to fighting for the freedom of enslaved people, as Phillips advocated. He was pelted with rocks and eggs before friends whisked him away when a small riot broke out.

Phillips was one of the most outspoken abolitionists of the era. Born in Boston in 1811 to a wealthy New England family, Phillips was educated at Harvard and practiced law until he became swept up in the anti-slave crusade in the 1830s. Abolitionists denounced slavery as a sin, and framed the debate over slavery as a moral issue rather than an economic or political one. Called the “golden trumpet” of the movement, Phillips’ shrill denunciation of slavery won many converts to the abolitionist cause and attracted many other Northerners to moderate anti-slave positions.

When the Civil War began, Phillips and other abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison exerted pressure on the administration of President Abraham Lincoln to make the destruction of slavery the primary objective of the war. For the first year and half, Lincoln insisted that the Union’s war goal was reunion of the states. He did this in order to keep the border states of Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland, and Delaware from seceding. Not until the Emancipation Proclamation of September 1862 would the stated purpose of the war shift.

The March 1862 incident in Cincinnati demonstrated the fierce resistance that existed in the Northern states to the proposition of fighting a war to free the enslaved people. The most outspoken resisters lived in the “Butternut” region—the southern parts of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Called Butternuts because their homespun clothing was dyed a light brown from nut extracts, residents of the region did not own enslaved people but shared many sentiments with Southerners. Lincoln encountered serious resistance from this area when he announced his Emancipation Proclamation.

READ MORE: 6 Early Abolitionists


Wendall Phillips booed in Cincinnati - Mar 24, 1862 - HISTORY.com

TSgt Joe C.

On this day in 1862, abolitionist orator Wendell Phillips is booed while attempting to give a lecture in Cincinnati, Ohio. The angry crowd was opposed to fighting for the freedom of slaves, as Phillips advocated. He was pelted with rocks and eggs before friends whisked him awaywhen a small riot broke out.

Phillips wasone ofthe most outspoken abolitionists of the era. Born in Boston in 1811 to a wealthy New England family, Phillips was educated at Harvard and practiced law until he became swept up in the anti-slave crusade in the 1830s. Abolitionists denounced slavery as a sin, and framed the debate over slavery as a moral issue rather than an economic or political one. Called the “golden trumpet” of the movement, Phillips’ shrill denunciation of slavery won many converts to the abolitionist cause and attracted many other Northerners to moderate anti-slave positions.

When the Civil War began, Phillips and other abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison exerted pressure on the administration of President Abraham Lincoln to make the destruction of slavery the primary objective of the war. For the first year and half, Lincoln insisted that the Union’s war goal was reunion of the states. He did this in order to keep the border states of Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland, and Delaware from seceding. Not until the Emancipation Proclamation of September 1862 would the stated purpose of the war shift.

The March 1862 incident in Cincinnati demonstrated the fierce resistance that existed in the Northern states to the proposition of fighting a war to free the slaves. The most outspoken resisters lived in the “Butternut” region–the southern parts of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Called Butternuts because their homespun clothing was dyed a light brown from nut extracts, residents of the region did not own slaves but shared many sentiments with Southerners. Lincoln encountered serious resistance from this area when he announced his Emancipation Proclamation.


My Civil War Obsession

Below is long report from the Covington Journal of March 29, 1862. The New York Times had a brief story about this incident at the time and here is another modern telling of this event. As the latter discusses, sentiment in Cincinnati was not altogether different than that in Kentucky, with a lot of support for the Union, but opposition to abolitionists and to extremists on both sides of the controversy - and Phillips was certainly an extremist.

Pike's Opera House, courtesy cincinnativiews.net

The Wendell Phillips Riot at Pike's Opera House
By an eye-witness

Monday night last some two thousand people assembled at Pike's Opera House, Cincinnati, to hear Wendell Phillips speak. A reporter looking in early in the evening would have classed the audience as "highly respectable." The people were dressed well enough, and as they came in took their seats quietly. There was perhaps an over-proportion of gaunt, long-haired men and ill-favored spectacled women - such as are recognized as among the elect at Women's Rights conventions or entertainments of spiritualists. At the appointed hour Phillips was introduced to the audience in a silly speech by Judge somebody, who likened him to a piece of heavy artillery, which had just made the echoes on the Potomac ring with its thunder ones, but feared that he was running counter to the order of the Secretary of War in speaking of the movements of the artillery, and closed with the remark that the historian, in writing out the history of the war, would class his "distinguished friend" as one of its greatest heroes. Phillips then commenced his address, and spoke for fifteen or twenty minutes without eliciting any decided manifestation of approbation or disapprobation from the great body of the audience.

Upon the utterance of an ultra abolition sentiment there was some applause, but not quite enough to drown a few hisses. Phillips said that "the slaveholders were sustained on one hand by four million blacks in bondage, and on the other by about as many mean whites." He had scarcely given utterance to the sentiment before a small stone was thrown at him from one of the upper tiers. Men jumped to their feet, with cries of "Put him out!" "Put him out!" and an individual was named as the offender, but no person seemed inclined to undertake the job of putting him out. When the stone struck the stage Phillips at once stopped speaking, stepped back a pace or tow, and seemed at a loss what to do or say. Waiting until the noise and confusion had partially subsided, he stepped forward and undertook to explain away the offensive remark. He said he intended no offense, and had used the expression as it was used by slaveholders themselves in speaking of non-slaveholders.

Our readers who heard Yancey speak at the Opera House will remember how he met the first displays of the mob spirit - how in act and word he defied the disturbers, and thus commanded their silence, and a hearing for himself. At the critical moment Phillips hesitated. He lacked the tack or the boldness to meet the emergency, and from that moment his fate with the audience was sealed. At no time after the first outbreak was order restored, though snatches of what the speaker said cold be heard. With elevated voice he declared: "For thirty years I have been an avowed Abolitionist for sixteen years a Disunionist." A shower of eggs - one or tow striking the speaker - greeted the declaration. "Put 'em out!" "Put 'em out!" resounded from all parts of the house. We were struck with the quite question of a lady: "Is it not strange that among so many men who want to "put 'em out" no one will undertake it?"

A fierce-looking little man in the parquet jumped up on his seat, and shaking his fist in the direction of the second tier exclaimed, "I dare you to come down here and do that!" There was a rush up stairs, supposed for a moment to be for the purpose of putting the rioters out but, as events proved, it was a gathering together of those who sympathized with them. During all this time Phillips continued to speak, but not many could hear a word he uttered.

The rioters, now confident in their power came down to the first floor, occupying the space in the rear of the front boxes. The leader, with the voice of a Stentor (sic - Senator?) , called out, "Three cheers for the Union!" and the "Three groans for the Abolitionists!" and both were given with a will.

Then followed a sort of colloquy, carried on in loud tones: "He's the man that wants to put the niggers in the work-shops alongside of us, isn't he a pretty bird? "

"Yes that may do for Massachusetts, but it smells to strong for us."

"He says the Constitution is a compact with the devil to the devil with him I say."

"Down with the nigger thieves and Abolitionists."


"Up with 'em, I say hand 'em up!"

In the meantime many of the women had left the house. Those who remained were of course excited and alarmed.

At this junction one of the rioters jumped up on a seat and exclaimed: "For God's sake don't shoot till the ladies get out!" This settled the business. There was a general rush for the doors, and in the midst of the confusion Phillips made his bow and retired.

Judging from what could be heard of the lecture, the purpose of the speaker was to show that the war was not caused by the acts of any man or set of men of the present day, bat was the natural an inevitable result of the attempt of the framers of the Constitution to reconcile two irreconcilable things - Freedom and Slavery that this Constitution and the Union under it were broken into fragments that the war ought to be prosecuted for the eradication of slavery and that if this was not done a reconstruction of the Union was not desirable.

It is to be regretted that the speaker was not permitted to have his say in quiet. We do not doubt that hundreds of men, who have of late been acting with the Republican or Abolition party, would have left the house thoroughly disgusted with the ultra opinions of the speaker and of the party of which he is an oracle. The "disturbance" is to be regretted on higher grounds. It was a gross violation of the Freedom of Speech - a glorious and inestimable right, which, with the Freedom of the Press, ought neither to be invaded nor surrendered by American citizens.


Cincinnati&rsquos Colored Citizens. Historical, Sociological and Biographical [Inscribed and Signed by Author].

Historical survey and sketches of African Americans and African American life and society in Cincinnati, Ohio. Includes over 150 pages of “[b]iographical sketches of citizens in every walk of life,” many accompanied by a portrait.

A native of Richmond, Virginia, author Wendell P. Dabney (1865–1952) was the son of former slaves. He briefly attended Oberlin College before gong to Boston to start a music studio. In 1894, he removed to Cincinnati.

“He began teaching music to many prominent Cincinnati families and eventually became involved in politics. Dabney served as the first African American city paymaster and was the first president of the local chapter of the NAACP. . In 1902, he started The Ohio Enterprise [newspaper], predecessor to The Union, which Dabney published from 1907 until 1952. Although Dabney accepted funds from the Republican Party for the newspaper and endorsed Republican candidates, he remained critical of their treatment of African Americans and used the paper as a voice of protest for the African American community in general. In the early 1920s, however, Dabney broke with the Republicans and shortly thereafter worked with the City Charter Committee. Until his death in 1952, Dabney continued to struggle against prejudice and used The Union to champion the cause of African Americans.”¹

Other contributors, whose writings are excerpted, include Carter Woodson (“Negroes of Cincinnati Prior to Civil War”) Levi Coffin, “President of the Underground Railroad” Frank W. Quillan and some-time Cincinnati journalist and writer, Lafcadio Hearn.

Cincinnati, Ohio: The Dabney Publishing Company, (1926). First Edition. [7], 440pp. 9¼ x 6¼ inches. Publisher’s dark blue cloth with gilt tilting. Inscribed by author on front endpaper: “Oliver Barrett Esq. Best wishes of W.P. Dabney 12/12/28.” Numerous half tone illustrations. Brief staining at tail of spine, not affecting text block lower corners bumped and rubbed otherwise very good.

Note. 1. Wendell P. Dabney | African American Resources | Cincinnati History Library and Archives accessed online.


Wendell Dabney, Jr., First President of the Cincinnati NAACP

Wendell Phillips Dabney was born in Richmond, Virginia , the son of former slaves. Dabney’s father had the necessary training and reputation as a cook and bartender to open a catering business after the Civil War and earn a higher standard of living for his family. Young Wendell graduated from Richmond High School in the first integrated graduation ceremony .

An intelligen t and erudite man , Dabney was also an avid reader and a talented musician . I n 1883, he was one of 15 African American students to enroll at Oberlin College . During his freshman year, he was the first violinist at the Oberlin Opera House and a member of the Cademian Literary Society .

Unfortunately, Dabney left college after one year to help support his family. For the next several years, he worked in Virginia as a waiter and then as a teacher until he moved to Boston to start a music studio.

In 1894, Dabney came to Cincinnati to see about a property willed to his mother. He intended to stay only for a few months however, he met Nellie Foster Jackson, a widow from Indiana with two sons, whom he married in 1897.

Wendell Dabney, Jr., First President of the Cincinnati NAACP – Photo from the Cincinnati Museum Center

Dabney decided to settle in Cincinnati, so he improved the property left to his mother and established a music studio. He began teaching music to many prominent Cincinnati families and eventually became involved in politics. Dabney served as the first African American city paymaster and was the first president of the Cincinnati NAACP Chapter .

In 1902, Dabney launched the Ohio Enterprise newspaper , the predecessor to The Union , to be a voice of protest f r o m the African American community . Although Dabney accepted funds from the Republican Party for the newspaper and endorsed Republican candidates, he remained critical of their treatment of his people. In the early 1920s, however, Dabney broke with the Republicans and shortly after that worked with the City Charter Committee.

Cincinnati’s Colored Citizens published by Wendell Dabney in 1926 – Photo from Amazon

In addition to his publishing activities, Dabney authored books and composed music. He published Cincinnati’s Colored Citizens in 1926 and wrote Maggie L. Walker: The Woman and Her Work , a biography of one of his longtime friends who became the first African American woman to own a bank.

Dabney also published Chisum’s Pilgrimage and Others , a collection of his writings from The Union . His musical compositions include You Will Miss the Colored Soldier , My Old Sweetheart , and God, Our Father, a Prayer .

Wendell Dabney champion ed the cause s of African Americans until he died in 1952.

The First 28, graciously sponsored by the Greater Cincinnati Foundation , celebrates Black Cincinnatians who were the first in their fields. Each day during Black History Month , we will celebrate athletes, artists, business leaders, civil rights activists, educators, physicians and politicians.

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Notes

Phillips was born in Boston, Massachusetts on November 29, 1811, to Sarah Walley and John Phillips, a successful lawyer, politician, and philanthropist. Phillips was schooled at Boston Latin School, and graduated from Harvard University in 1831. He went on to attend Harvard Law School, from which he graduated in 1833.

It was Phillips’s contention that racial injustice was the source of all of society’s ills. Like Garrison, Phillips denounced the Constitution for tolerating slavery. He disagreed with the argument of abolitionist Lysander Spooner that slavery was unconstitutional, and more generally disputed Spooner’s notion that any unjust law should be held legally void by judges.

Phillips was also active in efforts to gain equal rights for Native Americans, arguing that the 14th Amendment also granted citizenship to Indians. He proposed that the Andrew Johnson administration create a cabinet-level post that would guarantee Indian rights. Phillips helped create the Massachusetts Indian Commission with Indian rights activist Helen Hunt Jackson and Massachusetts governor William Claflin.

Although publicly critical of President Ulysses S. Grant’s drinking, he worked with Grant’s second administration on the appointment of Indian agents. Phillips lobbied against military involvement in the settling of Native American problems on the Western frontier. He accused General Philip Sheridan of pursuing a policy of Indian extermination.

In 1904 Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago was named in Phillips’ honor. In July 1915 a monument was erected in Boston Public Garden to commemorate Phillips. The Phillips Neighborhood of Minneapolis was named after Wendell Phillips.

The dedication ceremony dedicating the Wendell Phillips Memorial at the Boston Public Garden on July 15, 1915.


Chronology

In 1890, Dabney left Richmond and opened a music school in Boston for amateur and professional musicians. In 1893, he worked on an exhibition with Frederick Douglass for the Chicago World's Fair. In 1894, Dabney moved to Cincinnati to oversee property his mother had inherited from her aunt Serena Webb. This property, the Dumas Hotel, was built in the early 1840s and was Ohio's only hotel owned by an African American. It had served as a station for the Underground Railroad by which slaves were aided in their flight from their masters. Dabney installed a gymnasium in one part of the hotel and used the rest as a convention and meeting hall.

Dabney decided to stay in Cincinnati, and in August 1897, he married Nellie Foster Jackson. Dabney adopted Nellie's two sons. Needing additional income, Dabney used his musical knowledge to teach music courses for wealthy white Cincinnati residents. Songs he wrote were published by the George Jaberg and Wurlitzer Music companies.

He gave up his music career in 1895 when he became Cincinnati's first African American license clerk. From 1898 to 1923, Dabney served as assistant, then head paymaster in the Cincinnati Department of Treasury. He was able to save money to start his own daily newspaper.

Establishes Newspaper

Hoping to bring attention to issues of the African American community, Dabney started The Ohio Enterprise, then on February 13, 1907 Dabney established The Union. His motto for the newspaper, according to Eric Jackson, was: "For no people can become great without being united, for in union there is strength." From 1907 to 1952, The Union was influential in shaping both political and social opinions of Cincinnati's African American citizens. In the beginning Dabney accepted funds from the Republican Party while remaining critical of its treatment of African Americans. He decided to break with the Republicans and in 1925 became affiliated with the Independent Party.

Dabney was the first president of the Cincinnati branch of the NAACP, established in 1915. The NAACP staged several demonstrations against problems such as political injustice, racial violence, and segregated housing.

Dabney's writings reflected his interests in the experiences of African Americans in Cincinnati. He wrote that in spite of the conditions in Cincinnati, in spite of the racial violence and political injustice, African American Cincinnatians had established a lively and stable community. He wrote on race relations, discrimination, segregation, and urbanization.

Joseph Beaver, who worked at The Union as an office boy for several years, wrote that Dabney had on his office walls a galaxy of photos of his friends, both the famous and the not-so-famous. They included photos of W. C. Handy, "Father of the Blues" Bill "Bojan-gles" Robinson, author and tap dancer Philippa Schuyler, child protégé artist and composer W. E. B. Du Bois, American scholar and educator Peter Jackson, heavyweight boxer Paul Lawrence Dunbar and Langston Hughes, poets Madam Hattie Walker, bank president in Virginia and General Antonio Maceo, Cuba's liberator.

In The Union, Dabney wrote urging blacks to be civil in conduct. According to Gail Berry, he said: "Many of us talk so much about our civil rights that we forget about our civic duties." He also said: "We fight for our rights, why not so conduct ourselves as to cause the whites to see the injustice of withholding them?" Regarding critics who complained that the paper was all about Dabney, Beaver replied, "To feature oneself is not to say one necessarily praises oneself—but rather, he presents himself, his experiences, his ideas and opinions, on a public scale, as it were, for others to weigh."

On November 4, 1949, more than four hundred people gathered to honor Dabney with a celebration of his eighty-fourth birthday. In January 1950, the National Convention of Negro Publishers honored Dabney as a pioneer and leader in African American journalism.

On June 5, 1952, Dabney died in Cincinnati. As quoted by Berry, his stepson Leo said of him, "The Union will live on in spirit though the soul of it has fled. Its luster left with Dabney." According to Berry, Dabney was eulogized throughout the country as "an American institution dedicated to an unending crusade against segregation and discrimination and as the foremost advocator for Negro improvement and advancement." Berry quotes George Bernard Shaw as saying, "You can lose a man like that by your own death, but not by his."


Wendell Phillips booed in Cincinnati - HISTORY

Racial Identification:African-American
Politics: Republican 1907-1924 Independent 1925-1952
Owner: W.P. Dabney
Editor: W.P. Dabney
Published: Weekly Cincinnati, Ohio, 1907-1952
Call #: Roll 8847, October 1918-September 1923

The Union
The Union was a "one-man" paper, owned and edited by Wendell Phillips Dabney. Dabney, born in Richmond Virginia in 1865, was the son of a slave who had purchased his freedom. Dabney founded the Union February 13, 1907, but the paper's existence was precarious in its early years as it depended upon a stipend from the Republican party for political advertisements and uncertain income from subscribers and advertisers. Its motto was "For no people can become great without being united, for in union there is strength." The paper grew over time and found a faithful audience as a result from its journalistic integrity. The Union also had a following among various members of the white community who recognized and appreciated the paper's quality and Dabney's pungent comments regarding the contemporary scene.

Wendell Phillips Dabney (1865-1952)  born in Richmond, Virginia.

NOTE: Sometimes published items contain mistaken information. Occasionally there is a duplicate issue number or erroneous date. This is especially prevalent in Newspaper publications.

In an effort to reflect the original document, we have kept the original volume, number and date on the item information. Yet in order to add clarity, we have indicated what we believe the original issue, volume or date should be.


Dramatis Personae: Hamilton and Burr

Alexander Hamilton has always been honored as a critical Founding Father&mdashdashing, handsome, brilliant, and indispensable to the creation of the United States. As a child, his favorite authors were Pope and Plutarch. The illegitimate child of Rachael Fawcett Lavien born on the island of Nevis in the British West Indies, Hamilton became, perhaps, the nation's most illustrious emigrant, and right hand man to George Washington. He embodies American drive, ambition, and determination as no other could and, as is sung throughout the play, he will endure, succeed, and never "throw away his shot." The ultimate irony, of course, is that Hamilton counseled his teenage son Philip to do just that, which led to his death in a duel in 1801 and to Hamilton's identical demise on the bloodied ground of Weehawken, New Jersey, in 1804.

Aaron Burr, on the other hand, about the same age and equally ambitious as his competitor never attained the same esteemed place in American history. As Stanley Elkins and Eric McKitrick wrote in their 1993 Age of Federalism, for nearly all historians, Burr remains "an enigma." The grandson of the American theologian Jonathan Edwards, Burr nonetheless has been seen as the "dark side" of the force, seeming to represent pure greed, unalloyed ambition, "not" as Elkins and McKitrick asserted, a "representative man" but a "deviant type." Drawing on what historians have written about Burr, the novelist Gore Vidal pronounced Aaron Burr "a man of perfect charm and fascination. A monster, in short." In his highly amusing and perceptive novel, Vidal played the role of Burr's biographer and described him as "the devil&mdashassuming that the devil is no more than five foot six (an inch shorter than I), slender, with tiny feet (hooves?), high forehead (in the fading light I imagine vestigial horns), bald in front with hair piled high on his head, powdered absently in the old style, and held in place with a shell comb."

The musical's true genius, however, is in reeling Burr back into the American mainstream and in giving him near equal authority, punctuating the American fixation with self-ascendency, greed, power, and ambition. He is not, as Gore Vidal crafted him, a devil in a periwig. Seeking to "correct" Hamilton's faults, the well-intentioned Burr advised his friend that the problem with him was he told people exactly what he thought. Saying less, he advised an attentive but resistant Hamilton, was the sure way to power. Miranda's Hamilton, based on the biography by Ron Chernow, melds history and creativity to play with American memory, to change how we think about our past and ourselves. Key, of course, is having the characters performed by immensely talented actors and actresses of color. It challenges our all-too-comfortable&mdashand often ill-informed&mdashunderstanding of the past, forcing us to rethink who we have been and, one hopes, what we should be.


Photo, Print, Drawing Wendell Phillips

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Black History Month: Celebrating Cincinnati's African-American journalists then and now

In celebration of Black History Month, 9 On Your Side is highlighting historic and current leaders right here in the Tri-State each Tuesday in February. Reporter Kristen Swilley introduces us to pioneers in the series Black History Month: Then and Now.

This is the second in a series of four stories. Read the first here, the third here and the fourth here.

CINCINNATI -- The Bill of Rights enshrines freedom of the press in its First Amendment to ensure Americans are free to distribute information and opinions, but even in today’s newsrooms, minority journalists comprise less than one-fifth of the workforce.

Imagine what those figures were before integration and the civil rights movement.

Marjorie Parham wrote a column in The Cincinnati Herald for many years.

Ninety-nine-year-old Marjorie Parham remembers those days from when her late husband Gerald Porter founded The Cincinnati Herald as the city’s premiere African-American newspaper in 1955.

“It was a one-man staff really for the most part in its early days. He was a very, very hard worker,” Parham said. “It’s given African-Americans a voice. A voice that they otherwise wouldn’t have … Things that might have been smoothed over or overlooked or underreported, we made public.”

That defiance and determination had its forerunner in another black newspaper publisher decades earlier: Wendell Phillips Dabney, whom Scott Gampfer of the Cincinnati Museum Center called one of the most influential people in Cincinnati history.

Gampfer, who serves as director of the museum’s history collections and library, said Dabney started The Ohio Enterprise in 1902 and then published The Union from 1907 to 1952, often as a one-man show.

“Dabney wrote most of the copy for the paper. He wrote the editorial comments. He sold the advertising. He really was the newspaper, and the newspaper was Dabney,” Gampfer said.

Dabney remained critical of treatment of African-Americans and used his paper as a voice of protest for the African-American community in general, according to the Cincinnati History Library and Archives.

This issue of The Union was published by Wendell Phillips Dabney on May 3, 1934.

He sometimes went to extremes to defend his paper, including keeping a revolver on his desk and sometimes defying death threats.

“He published in the paper his schedule like, ‘Here’s when I leave my house. Here’s the route I walk. Here’s when I arrive at the office,’” Gampfer said. “Basically, Dabney was saying, ‘If you want to get me, here I am.’”

Both Dabney and Porter followed their calling to the end. Dabney died of natural causes, working on The Union until his death in 1952. Porter died while filing one last story for the Herald.

“He had been out, taking pictures of some sort of an affair,” Parham said.

On his way back, he fell asleep at the wheel and hit a guardrail, Parham said. He was taken to Our Lady of Mercy Hospital (now known as Mercy Health-Anderson Hospital).

“And when I got (to the hospital), I was met by a nurse who told me that my husband had been up in X-ray, but if he needed further care, I’d have to move him because they didn’t accept Negro bed patients,” Parham said.

He died of his injuries shortly after the crash, leaving his widow with “a newspaper she did not know how to run and overwhelming debts,” according to the Cincinnati History Library and Archives.

An old copy of The Cincinnati Herald shows a photograph of downtown Cincinnati.

Parham carried on as publisher with the help of her son, Bill Spillers, and a friend with accounting experience, Hartwell Parham, who eventually became her second husband. They published the Herald for several decades until selling it to Sesh Communications in 1996.

Porter’s legacy carries on in The Cincinnati Herald's Avondale office, where publisher Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney has taken the reins.

"People have to be vigilant. We have to keep fighting. We have to keep advocating," Kearney said, adding that she still values advice from Parham, whose photo hangs in the Herald’s office. "She's been really good about helping us stay on course."

While much has changed at the Herald, the staff members still speak up for African-American causes with the hope that everybody can be heard.

“I think the danger is to think there should just be one viewpoint, one leader, one voice. So many people have a lot to say, and we have to work together,” Kearney said.


Watch the video: Remembering Crosley Field (August 2022).