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Nokomis SP-609 - History

Nokomis SP-609 - History



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Nokomis
Nokomis was taken over by the Navy 1 July 1917 and renamed Kwa~ind (SP 1233) (q.v.) 22 November 1917.

I (SP-609: dp. 1,265; 1. 243'; b. 31'10"; dr. 12'10", B. 16 k.;
cpl. 191; a. 4 3", 2 mg.)

The first Nokomis, a yacht built as Nokomis II by Pusey ~Ic Jones, Uilmington, Del. in 1914, was purchased by the Navy from Horace E. Dodge, Detroit, Mich. 1 June 1917; re-named Nokomie 19 November 1917; and commissioned at Philadelphia 3 December 1917.

Fitted out at Philadelphia, Nokomis sailed for Bermuda 19 December with a French submarine chaser in tow. She departed Bermuda for Brest 8 January 1918, stopping en route at the Azores and Leixces, Portugal. Operating with the U.S. Patrol Squadron for the remainder of the war, she helped protect American troop transports approaching the coast of France.

Terminating this duty in 1919, Nokomis returned to the United States in August. Reclassified PY-6 in 1920, the yacht decommissioned at New York 25 February 1921. Outfitted as a tender for the Naval Governor of Santo Domingo in July 1921, she did not assume this duty, but conducted surveys in Mexican and Caribbean waters under direction of the Hydrographic Office.

Returning to Norfolk 24 September 1934, Nokomia decommissioned 15 February 1938 and was struck from the Navy Register 25 May 1938.


USS Vedette (SP-163)

The first USS Vedette (SP-163) was a commercial yacht built in 1899. At the outbreak of World War I, the yacht was leased by the United States Navy, and was used as a patrol vessel in the North Atlantic Ocean. She served honorably during the war, rescuing survivors at sea, and attacking a German U-Boat. At war’s end, she was converted to her original configuration and returned to her owner, the railroad executive, financier, and philanthropist Frederick W. Vanderbilt (1856-1938) of New York City.


Nokomis Genealogy (in Montgomery County, IL)

NOTE: Additional records that apply to Nokomis are also found through the Montgomery County and Illinois pages.

Nokomis Birth Records

Nokomis Cemetery Records

Nokomis cemetery Billion Graves

Saint Louis Cemetery Billion Graves

Zion Cemetery Billion Graves

Nokomis Census Records

1825 census of Montgomery County, Illinois FamilySearch Books

1855 state census of Montgomery County, Illinois FamilySearch Books

United States Federal Census, 1790-1940 Family Search

Nokomis Church Records

Nokomis City Directories

Nokomis Death Records

Nokomis Immigration Records

Nokomis Map Records

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Nokomis, Montgomery County, Illinois, June 1893 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Nokomis, Montgomery County, Illinois, November 1899 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Nokomis, Montgomery County, Illinois, September 1906 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Nokomis, Montgomery County, Illinois, September 1912 Library of Congress

Nokomis Marriage Records

Nokomis Newspapers and Obituaries

Offline Newspapers for Nokomis

According to the US Newspaper Directory, the following newspapers were printed, so there may be paper or microfilm copies available. For more information on how to locate offline newspapers, see our article on Locating Offline Newspapers.

Free Press-Gazette. (Nokomis, Ill.) 1880-1918

Free Press-Progress. (Nokomis, Montgomery County, Ill.) 1918-Current

Free Press. (Nokomis, Ill.) 1870s-1880

Nokomis Probate Records

Nokomis School Records

Nokomis, IL High School Class of 1927 Photo Old Yearbooks

Nokomis, IL Township High School 1925 Football Team Photo Old Yearbooks

Additions or corrections to this page? We welcome your suggestions through our Contact Us page


There are 11 census records available for the last name Nokomis. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Nokomis census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 2 immigration records available for the last name Nokomis. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 5 military records available for the last name Nokomis. For the veterans among your Nokomis ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 11 census records available for the last name Nokomis. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Nokomis census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 2 immigration records available for the last name Nokomis. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 5 military records available for the last name Nokomis. For the veterans among your Nokomis ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


How to Correctly Dispute Errors on Your Credit Report

There are better ways to dispute your credit reports than buying dispute letter templates, and the process is actually very easy. First, get copies of your credit reports so you can review them for errors. You have the right to a free copy of your credit reports once every 12 months from AnnualCreditReport.com. You can also get a free credit report from Experian every 30 days.

If you determine there is information appearing on your credit report or reports that is legitimately incorrect or that you believe can no longer be verified by the source of the information, the law protects you. In those cases, you should file a formal dispute. Specifically, if your Experian credit report contains any errors, you can file your dispute online, via good old-fashioned U.S. mail, or over the phone. To dispute an item on your Experian credit report by mail, print and fill out the online dispute form, which asks for information to verify your identity and allows you to note the specific items you're disputing and why you think they are incorrect. Then mail that form to Experian at P.O. Box 4500, Allen, TX 75013.

The dispute and investigation process cannot take more than 30 to 45 days, and most investigations are completed within a few weeks. Once the credit reporting agency has completed the investigation process, it is required to provide you with written results within five business days.


The Nokomis Group

The Nokomis Group is owned and operated by Noleen Glavish and commenced trading in 1990 as a specialist publisher of high quality natural history books, portfolios, prints, gift cards and original artworks by Australian natural history artists.

In mid 2018, we expanded to include a NEW BOOKS division in addition to those published by the Nokomis Group. This came about as Andrew and Belinda Isles who own Andrew Isles Natural History Books made a decision to retreat from stocking new books and are concentrating on Antiquarian and Second hand books. This new division is primarily a mail order business selling natural history books and we ship worldwide. Our stock holding is substantial and if you click on the New Books tab above, you will see that we are offering a comprehensive range of natural history new books which is predominantly Australian but covers all parts of the globe.

Natural history subjects include birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, invertebrates, botany, gardening, ecology, insects, marine, biology, aviculture, entomology and conservation. We are constantly adding new titles and will be happy to source any titles which may interest you if they are not already listed.

Regular mailings are sent to clients and if you wish to be on the list, please complete the subscribe form.


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Nokomis East History

Prior to 1900, our community’s current location was a major Native American gathering area and until 1880 there was a village located between Lake Nokomis and Lake Hiawatha in the vicinity of the current Lake Nokomis Community Center.

Minnehaha Park, located just outside Nokomis East, played an important role in the development of the area by drawing thousands of visitors to view its natural beauty. Because of the large number of visitors to the area, rail transit and a depot were established near the neighborhood as early as 1865.

A number of neighborhood landmarks were in place by 1930, including:

  • Longfellow Zoological Gardens (1890)
  • Twin Cities Motor Speedway (1916) – Current site of the MSP Airport
  • Lake Nokomis Bath House on the main beach (1920)
  • Nokomis Junior High (1920) – Current site of the Nokomis Square Co-op
  • Veteran’s Bureau Hospital (1927)
  • Keewaydin School & Park (1927) – Formerly known as the Alexander Ramsey School
  • Bob’s Barber Shop (1928)

Our neighborhood developed before others due to the availability of streetcar routes and rail lines. Aiding in the development were the parklands along Minnehaha Falls, Minnehaha Creek and Lake Nokomis (formerly named Lake Amelia).

The majority of single-family houses were built between 1920 and 1960 with a building boom during the 1920s and 1940s. Single-family homes make up 77% of Nokomis East units with an additional 5.2% as duplexes and triplexes. The remainder of units are multi-family buildings. The Bossen area apartment buildings were built in the 1960’s.

Racial covenants are a part of the history of Nokomis East. Covenants were tools used by real estate developers in the 19th and 20th century to prevent people of color from buying or occupying property. To learn more, visit Mapping Prejudice and use the interactive Minneapolis property map.

Today, 80% of the home units are owner-occupied and 20% rental – compared to 51% rental for Minneapolis as a whole. And 34% of Nokomis East households are considered cost-burdened.

Our main transportation corridors are the neighborhood boundaries: Cedar Avenue, 34th and 28th Avenues, 50th and 54th Streets, Hiawatha Avenue (Highway 55), and Crosstown Highway 62. Natural resources in a convenient urban setting are the hallmark of the Nokomis East area. Lake Nokomis, our western boundary, offers beauty and recreation for the entire metro area. On our northern boundary, the picturesque Minnehaha Parkway and Creek provide tranquil vistas and unspoiled beauty. Public transportation provides light rail and bus service to downtown, shopping amenities like the Mall of America and Southdale and the Minneapolis VA Health Care System.

Local residents can find most of their consumer needs in the neighborhood. Our major shopping district on 34th Avenue between 50th and 54th Streets is home to the Nokomis (55417) branch of the U.S. Post Office, the Nokomis branch of the Hennepin County Libraries, two banks, a grocery store and a variety of other businesses. Business also thrives in other commercial “pockets” throughout the neighborhood. We are proud of our local business association, the Nokomis East Business Association (NEBA), which promotes a sense of community through businesses.

There are two Minneapolis Public School buildings within our boundaries. Both are part of the K-8, Lake Nokomis Community School: the Keewaydin (upper) and Wenonah (lower) campuses. A third building, the former Morris Park Elementary, is now operated by Hiawatha Leadership Academy, a charter school. Two regional parks (Minnehaha and Lake Nokomis), and three neighborhood parks, (Bossen Field, Keewaydin and Morris Park) provide recreation and educational programming for all age groups. Seven churches serve residents of various denominations.

While a few non-profit agencies, including NENA serve our residents, we do not have a major social service presence in our neighborhoods.

A history of community activism spurred by an appreciation for natural beauty and a zeal to maintain a high standard of living is evident in the neighborhood. Several neighborhood wins include:


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About Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll

Royal Eason Ingersoll (20 June 1883 – 20 May 1976) was a United States Navy four-star admiral who served as Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT) from January 1, 1942 to late1944 Commander, Western Sea Frontier from late 1944 to 1946 and Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet/Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (DCOMINCH/DCNO) from late 1944 to late 1945.

Ingersoll was born in Washington, D.C., on 20 June 1883. He was second in a succession of three generations of U.S. Naval officers: his father, Rear Admiral Royal R. Ingersoll - United States Naval Academy class of 1868, and his son, Lieutenant Royal Rodney Ingersoll II - USNA class of 1934, was killed in a "friendly fire" accident on board the aircraft carrier Hornet (CV-8) on 4 June 1942, during the naval Battle of Midway.

Ingersoll graduated from the Naval Academy in 1905 and reported as a passed midshipman to the battleship Missouri (BB-11). In August of that year, he was one of the young officers assigned special temporary duty to attend the Russian-Japanese Peace Conference, held at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, in Kittery, Maine. When detached from the Missouri in May 1906, he was assigned briefly to the Marietta (PG-15), and later the Hancock (AP-3), then assisted in fitting out the Connecticut (BB-18) at the New York Navy Yard. He served on board that battleship from her commissioning on 29 September 1906, until October 1907.

Ingersoll served as an instructor of Seamanship and International Law, and later of English, at the Naval Academy between 1911 and 1913, preceding his assignment to the Asiatic Squadron. There he joined the armored cruiser Saratoga (ACR-2), the flagship of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet. He served briefly as her First Lieutenant, and then he became the Aide and Flag Lieutenant to the Chief-of-Staff of the Asiatic Fleet's Commander.

He returned to the United States, and on 1 June 1916, reported as Assistant for Communications, and Communication Officer, in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Navy Department. Concerning that assignment, he subsequently wrote: "The work in this office began to pick up as the tension in the diplomatic relations with Germany increased, and overwhelmed us on 2 February 1917, when diplomatic relations with that country were broken. " For organizing the greatly expanded Naval Communications Office during World War I, he was awarded the Navy Cross and cited "for distinguished service in the line of his profession in organizing, developing, and administering the Communication Office of the Navy Department."

After the Armistice in November 1918, he was ordered to join Admiral William S. Benson, USN, then Chief of Naval Operations, concerning the establishment of a communication office for that commission. In February 1919, he returned home in the George Washington with the Presidential party, handling messages for President Woodrow Wilson on the voyage across the Atlantic.

In March 1919 he again joined the Connecticut, serving this time as her Executive Officer until September 1920, then transferring to the Arizona (BB-39). In June 1921, he reported to the Navy Department for a tour of duty in the Office of Naval Intelligence, and on 26 March 1924, assumed command of the Nokomis (SP-609). Under his command, that gunboat was fitted out as a survey ship and cruised in the Cuban–Haitian area, making new charts of the north coast of Cuba.

Completing the Senior Course at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island in June 1927, he served the following year as a member of that staff. In June 1928, he reported for duty as Assistant Chief of Staff to Commander Battle Fleet, in the California (BB-44) and continued similar duty on the Staff when Admiral William V. Pratt became Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, with his flag in the Texas (BB-35). In August 1930, he was assigned to the Division of Fleet Training, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Navy Department, where he served until May 1933. He then reported as Commanding Officer of the heavy cruiser Augusta (CA-31), and in November 1933, was transferred to the Mare Island Naval Shipyard to fit out the San Francisco (CA-38). He commanded this cruiser from her commissioning on 10 February 1934 until June 1935.

The following three years of duty in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, as Director of the War Plans Division, included his assignment in June 1936 as Technical Assistant to the American Delegation at the London Naval Conference in 1935 – 36. He again went to London in December 1937, concerned with requirements growing out of the London Naval Treaty limiting naval armament.

On 16 July 1938, Ingersoll took command of Cruiser Division Six of the Scouting Force, his flag in the cruiser Minneapolis (CA-36). Two years later, he returned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations as Assistant to the Chief, and on 1 January 1942, with the rank of Vice Admiral, he was designated Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, with the Augusta as his flagship.

Ingersoll was promoted to the rank of Admiral on the following 1 July. Having organized the movements of the thousands of ships across the Atlantic in order to have men and supplies on hand at the precise hour for the North African landings in November 1942, he also had the responsibility of planning the composition of the naval escort forces which insured the troop convoys' safe arrival.

Following the African invasion, the Atlantic Fleet was employed in running troop convoys and transporting stores, munitions, and fuel to the United Kingdom and the Mediterranean. As a subsidiary responsibility, it ran the convoys on the coast of Brazil and continuously waged the anti-submarine war which had been a matter of primary concern since the outbreak of hostilities. Ingersoll is generally credited with solving the U-boat and Atlantic logistics problems. In addition, he had the responsibility of defense of the Western Hemisphere by U.S. naval forces and made changes in the disposition of air and surface forces stationed at various points in North and South America. For his services in this command, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal and cited as a ". forceful and resolute leader under the critical conditions existing throughout a period of approximately three years. against a determined and ruthless enemy intent on world domination. "

In November 1944, he was detached from command of the Atlantic Fleet and became Commander Western Sea Frontier, with headquarters at San Francisco. In addition to commanding the naval forces engaged in protecting shipping in coastal waters, he managed the flow of supplies to the Pacific Fleet through West Coast ports. In carrying out this assignment, he had the status of a Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet, and Deputy Chief of Naval Operations. After the reorganization of the Navy in October 1945, he continued to serve as Commander Western Sea Frontier until 10 April 1946, when he was relieved of all active duty pending his retirement that became official on 1 August 1946.

In addition to the Navy Cross and the Distinguished Service Medal, Ingersoll was awarded the World War I Victory Medal the American Defense Service Medal European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal. He was also awarded the Chevalier of the Legion of Honor by the French Government and the Order of Naval Merit (Grand Cross) by the Government of Brazil. Ingersoll was married in 1910 to Louise Van Harlingen of Atlanta, Georgia and had two children. Ingersoll died on 20 May 1976. In 1979, Mrs. Louise Ingersoll was the sponsor for USS Ingersoll (DD-990) their daughter, Alice Jean Ingersoll Nagle, acting as proxy sponsor. Their son, Royal Rodney II, had been (with Admiral Ingersoll's father) the namesake of the USS Ingersoll (DD-652).


Nokomis SP-609 - History

USS Felix Taussig , a 6253 gross ton (12,800 tons displacement) cargo ship, was built in 1917 at Newport News, Virginia, as the civilian freighter of the same name. In late August 1918 she was taken over by the Navy and placed in commission. The ship made three trans-Atlantic voyages to France during the next seven months, carrying cargo and provisions to support U.S. World War I and post-war activities. USS Felix Taussig was decommissioned in April 1919 and returned to her owners at that time. She then returned to commercial service and continued to operate as S.S. Felix Taussig until after World War II. In 1948 the ship became the Italian flag freighter Ata and was scrapped in 1953

This page features all available views concerning USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282) and the civilian freighter Felix Taussig .

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

S.S. Felix Taussig (American Freighter, 1917)

Probably photographed upon completion of construction, circa 1917. Built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company at Newport News, Virginia, this ship was requisitioned by the Emergency Fleet Corporation for World War I service and chartered by the U.S. Army. She was acquired by the Navy on 29 August 1918 and placed in commission two days later as USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282). She was decommissioned on 26 April 1919 and transferred to the U.S. Shipping Board for return to her owners, the Crowell & Thurlow Steamship Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The original print is in National Archives' Record Group 19-LCM.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 62KB 740 x 605 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

At anchor, dressed with flags and painted in pattern camouflage, circa 1918-1919.
The original photograph is printed on postal card ("AZO") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2005.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 43KB 740 x 470 pixels

S.S. Ata (American/Italian Freighter, 1917)

This ship was completed in 1917 at Newport News as S.S. Felix Taussig and served in the U.S. Navy in 1918-1919 as USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282). She operated as the Italian Ata from 1948 until scrapped in 1953.

Donation of Captain Stephen S. Roberts, USNR (Retired), 2007.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 51KB 740 x 490 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

View looking aft from the ship's foremast in 1918, showing signal flags, bridge top, kingposts, smokestack and other topsides' features.
The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2009.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 112KB 900 x 570 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

View looking toward the stern from the midships' deckhouse, as the ship rolls in heavy seas, 1918-1919.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2009.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 81KB 900 x 555 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

View looking toward the stern from the midships' deckhouse, as the ship rolls in heavy seas, 1918-1919.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2009.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 78KB 900 x 560 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

Crew of the ship's forward gun (3"/50 type) in action, 1918-1919.
The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2009.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 68KB 900 x 575 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

Crew of the ship's after gun (4"/50 type) in action, 1918-1919.
The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2009.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 74KB 545 x 925 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

Troops at mess on the ship's deck, while homeward bound from Europe on 22 March 1919.
The original photograph is printed on postcard ("AZO") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2007.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 96KB 740 x 475 pixels

USS Felix Taussig (ID # 2282)

Officers pose with a large gun being transported by the ship in 1918-1919.
The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.


Watch the video: PERFECT Small Beach Town Between Sarasota u0026 Venice. Nokomis (August 2022).