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454th Bombardment Group

454th Bombardment Group


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454th Bombardment Group

History - Books - Aircraft - Time Line - Commanders - Main Bases - Component Units - Assigned To

History

The 454th Bombardment Group was a B-24 group that fought with the Fifteenth Air Force in Italy, taking part in the strategic bombing campaign and supporting the group troops fighting in Italy and the south of France.

The group was activated on 1 June 1943 and trained with the B-24. The group was one of six B-24 groups that were originally meant to have reached Italy by December 1943, but it didn't arrive until January 1944.

The group's main role was to participate in the strategic bombing campaign, hitting targets in Italy, France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Austria, Yugoslavia, Romania and Greece. Targets included the usual oil refineries, aircraft factories, wider industrial areas, harbours and airfields. Some of its targets were chosen to aid the advancing Soviet armies as they entered the Balkans.

The group also flew some tactical missions to support the Allied troops in Italy and the south of France.

On 6-7 February 1944 the Luftwaffe made a rare attack on the Anzio beach head. In response the Allies attacked the airfields at Viterbo, Tarquinia and Orvieto. The 454th was one of three groups that took part in the 110 aircraft attack, which reduced the level of Luftwaffe activity over Anzio for several days.

The group played a limited part in Operation Strangle, the effort to isolate the German frontline in Italy by cutting transport links. Most of the time this role was carried out by the tactical air forces, but Strategic helped from time to time, especially when weather elsewhere in Europe limited their activities. On 28 March 1944 the group took part in the Fifteenth Air Force's first '1000-ton' raid, an attack on marshalling yards in northern Italy.

In the spring and summer of 1944 the group helped support the advance on Rome. In August 1944 it switched its attention to southern France to help Operation Dragoon. In April 1945 the group supported the final victorious Allied offensive in northern Italy which ended with the surrender of the German army in Italy.

The group received two Distinguished Unit Citations. The first came for an attack on the airfield at Bad Voslau on 12 April 1944. The second was for an attack on steel plants at Linz when the group was leading the 304th Bombardment Wing.

The group returned to the United States in July 1945. It was redesignated as the 454th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) in August 1945, but was inactivated on 17 October 1945 and allocated to the reserve.

Books

Aircraft

June 1943-October 1945: Consolidated B-24 Liberator

Timeline

14 May 1943Constituted as 454th Bombardment Group (Heavy)
1 June 1943Activated
Dec 1943-Jan 1944To Italy and Fifteenth Air Force
April 1945Combat ends
July 1945To US
Aug 1945Redesignated 454th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy)
17 October 1945Inactivated

Commanders (with date of appointment)

Col. Horace D Aynesworth: c. Jun 1943
Col. John A Way: 22Mar 1945
Lt Col William R Large Jr:21 May 1945
Lt Col Edward R Casey: 24May 1945-unkn.

Main Bases

Alamogordo AAFld, NM: 1Jun 1943
Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz: 1Jul 1943
McCook AAFld, Neb: c. 31 Jul1943
Charleston AAFld, SC: 3 Oct-Dec1943
San Giovanni, Italy: Jan 1944-July 1945
Sioux Falls AAFld, SD: 1 Aug 1945
Pyote AAFld, Tex: 17 Aug-17 Oct 1945

Component Units

736th Bombardment Squadron: 1943-45
737th Bombardment Squadron: 1943-45
738th Bombardment Squadron: 1943-45
739th Bombardment Squadron: 1943-45

Assigned To

1944-45: 304th Bombardment Wing; Fifteenth Air Force


  • History
  • Korean War
  • Strategic Air Command
  • Lineage
  • Assignments
  • Components
  • Stations
  • Aircraft flown
  • Awards
  • See also
  • References
  • Bibliography
  • External links

The wing's predecessor was the 454th Bombardment Group, activated in 1943 as a United States Army Air Forces combat organization. It served primarily in the Mediterranean Theater during World War II. While in combat the group earned two Distinguished Unit Citations. The group served as a bombardment unit in the reserves after World War II.

The Wing was established during the Korean War as the 454th Troop Carrier Wing, a reserve organization at Portland International Airport, Oregon. It was discontinued six months later, when the 403d Troop Carrier Wing was released from active duty and assumed its mission, personnel and equipment. In 1962, the unit was redesignated as the 454th Bombardment Wing, and became part of SAC. Flying Boeing B-52 Stratofortress bombers, the 454th was integrated into SAC's combat forces in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. The 454th Bombardment Wing completed more than 100 missions to South Vietnam without losing a single bomber to enemy aircraft fire. The wing was inactivated in 1969 with the end of SAC operations from Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi.


Contents

Korean War

Continental Air Command established the 454th Troop Carrier Wing at Portland International Airport, Oregon in June 1952 to replace the 922d Reserve Training Wing, [1] which had taken over reserve activities at Portland following the mobilization of the 403d Troop Carrier Wing. It was equipped with Curtiss C-46 Commandos. Its activation as a reserve transport unit was short, as it was inactivated and its mission, personnel and equipment transferred to the 403d Troop Carrier Wing when the 403d was released from active duty in January 1953.

Strategic Air Command

4228th Strategic Wing

The origins of the assumption of the bombardment mission by the 454th began in 1955 when Strategic Air Command (SAC) took over Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, establishing the 4228th Air Base Squadron as a caretaker organization to prepare the base for use by strategic bombardment and air refueling units. [2] On 1 July 1958 the squadron expanded to a group and the 4228th Strategic Wing was organized and assigned to the 4th Air Division [3] to control the group and three maintenance squadrons. The wing's first operational squadron, the 901st Air Refueling Squadron, flying Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers, was activated a month later.

In March 1959, the 52d Aviation Depot Squadron was activated to oversee the wing's special weapons. The 4228th became fully organized on 15 June 1959 when the 492d Bombardment Squadron (BS), consisting of 15 Boeing B-52 Stratofortresses moved to Columbus from Carswell Air Force Base, Texas where it had been one of the three squadrons of the 7th Bombardment Wing. This was part of SAC's plan to disperse its strike force to reduce its vulnerability to a first strike by the Soviet Uniton. Starting in 1960, one third of the wing's aircraft were maintained on fifteen-minute alert, fully fueled and ready for combat to reduce vulnerability to a Soviet missile strike. [4] This was increased to half the wing's aircraft in 1962. [5] The 4228th (and later the 454th) continued to maintain an alert commitment until the 454th was inactivated except for periods when the wing's aircraft were deployed to support operations in Southeast Asia. In 1962, the wing's bombers began to be equipped with the GAM-77 Hound Dog and the GAM-72 Quail air-launched cruise missiles, The 4228th Airborne Missile Maintenance Squadron was activated in November to maintain these missiles

In 1962, in order to perpetuate the lineage of many currently inactive bombardment units with illustrious World War II records, Headquarters SAC received authority from Headquarters USAF to discontinue its Major Command controlled (MAJCON) strategic wings that were equipped with combat aircraft and to activate Air Force controlled (AFCON) units, most of which were inactive at the time which could carry a lineage and history. [6]

454th Bombardment Wing

As a result the 4228th SW was replaced by the 454th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, [1] which assumed its mission, personnel, and equipment on 1 February 1963. [7] In the same way the 736th Bombardment Squadron, one of the unit's World War II historical bomb squadrons, replaced the 492d. The 858th Medical Group, 52d Munitions Maintenance Squadron and the 901st Air Refueling Squadron were reassigned to the 454th. Component support units were replaced by units with numerical designation of the newly established wing. Under the Dual Deputate organization, [8] all flying and maintenance squadrons were directly assigned to the wing, so no operational group element was activated. Each of the new units assumed the personnel, equipment, and mission of the units being discontinued.

The 454th Bomb Wing conducted air refueling operations and trained in bombardment operations. It converted to the B-52D in 1965 for Vietnam operations. Once operationally ready with the B-52D, the 454th wing headquarters, staff, tactical aircraft and crews and maintenance personnel were integrated into SAC's combat forces in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. Elements of the 454th Bombardment Wing completed more than 100 missions to South Vietnam without losing a single bomber to enemy aircraft fire. In May 1967 General Edward O. Martin assumed command of the 454th Bombardment Wing at Columbus, and one month later he led the wing on its second deployment to the Western Pacific area in support of Southeast Asia operations and returned to Columbus in December 1967. In May 1968 the 454th Wing made its third deployment to the Western Pacific area, its second under the command of General Martin.

Some upgraded B-52Cs were also transferred from the 99th Bombardment Wing during 1968 and 1969 and were operated as crew trainers.

By 1969 as the demand for pilots to support the war in Southeast Asia increased, the number of B-52s based stateside fell because they were needed overseas. At the same time, Minuteman and Polaris missiles were taking their places in strategic deterrence, replacing much of the bomber alert force. In addition, funds were also needed to cover the costs of combat operations. The 454th Bombardment Wing was inactivated on 2 July 1969 and its aircraft were reassigned to other SAC units. As part of the inactivation, Columbus Air Force Base was transferred to Air Training Command and resumed a pilot training mission.


External links

  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.
  • Mueller, Robert (1989). Air Force Bases, Vol. I, Active Air Force Bases Within the United States of America on 17 September 1982. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.
  • Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). Air Force Combat Wings, Lineage & Honors Histories 1947-1977. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.
  • Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). A Guide to Air Force Lineage and Honors (2d, Revised ed.). Maxwell AFB, AL: USAF Historical Research Center.

This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

Bibliography

  1. ^ a b c Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). Air Force Combat Wings, Lineage & Honors Histories 1947-1977. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 249–250.
  2. ^ a b Mueller, Robert (1989). Air Force Bases, Vol. I, Active Air Force Bases Within the United States of America on 17 September 1982. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 91–96.
  3. ^ "Factsheet 4 Air Division". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on October 30, 2012 . Retrieved March 12, 2014 .
  4. ^ "Abstract (Unclassified), Vol 1, History of Strategic Air Command, Jan-Jun 1957 (Secret)". Air Force History Index . Retrieved March 4, 2014 .
  5. ^ "Abstract (Unclassified), History of the Strategic Bomber since 1945 (Top Secret, downgraded to Secret)". Air Force History Index. 1 April 1975 . Retrieved March 4, 2014 .
  6. ^ MAJCON units could not carry a permanent history or lineage. Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). A Guide to Air Force Lineage and Honors (2d, Revised ed.). Maxwell AFB, AL: USAF Historical Research Center. p. 12.
  7. ^ The 454th Wing continued, through temporary bestowal, the history, and honors of the World War II 454th Bombardment Group. It was also entitled to retain the honors (but not the history or lineage) of the 4228th. This temporary bestowal ended in 1969, when the wing was inactivated.
  8. ^ Under this plan flying squadrons reported to the wing Deputy Commander for Operations and maintenance squadrons reported to the wing Deputy Commander for Maintenance
  9. ^ a b c AF Pamphlet 900-2, Unit Decorations, Awards and Campaign Participation Credits Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC, 15 Jun 1971, p. 391

Notes


454th Bomb Group

B-24J-1-NT #42-78503 "Jodey" Code: 454th Bomb Group - 736th Bomb Squadron - 15th AF Shot down 16 February 1944 with Bruce Rabun Crew Bruce Rabun Crew was lost 16 Feb 44 in 42-52261 - MACR 2488. First deliveries of J-NT's was approx. May 44. 42-78503 has soft (unconfirmed) connection to 449th BG, 719th BS, listed as ex 454/736 and arriving in 449th in February '45.

B-24G-16-NT #42-78377 "Easy Take Off" Code: #61 454th Bomb Group - 738th Bomb Squadron - 15th AF

Emblem of the 454th Bomb Group

San Giovanni Airfield, Italy Home of the 454th and 455th Bomb Groups

Crew of the 739th Bomb squadron of the 454th Bombardment Group. Back row from left: Robert Darcy, pilot Vincent Martino, bombardier James Maclean, navigator John Carpenter Jr, copilot Front row from left: Ellis Sanderson, waist gunner William Calhoun, tail gunner Howard Glenn Crissman, tail gunner Wilbur Mashburn, engineer Charles Carnathan, radio Robert Morrow, nose gunner

The group was constituted as 454th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 14 May 1943 and activated on 1 June at Davis-Monthan Field, near Tucson, Arizona. Training began immediately on Consolidated B-24 Liberators[2] and the ground cadre was sent on 3 July to Army Air Force School of Applied Tactics at Orlando AAB, Florida. On 15 July, planes were sent from Davis-Monthan to join them at Pinecastle AAF, Florida for practical field training.[citation needed]

From their bases in Florida, the ground echelon was transferred on 28 July 1943 to McCook AAF, Nebraska and, on 1 August, the air echelon joined them. This was the first operational unit to use the newly constructed McCook airfield.[citation needed] On 28 September the Group was reassigned to Charleston AAB, South Carolina

North American B-24J Liberator 42-78489 over a target. This aircraft was later lost on 20 March 1945
On 2 December 1943 the aircrews and some key ground personnel were sent to Mitchel Field, New York in preparation for deployment overseas. These personnel were subsequently transferred to Morrison Field, Florida and flew the southern route to North Africa. After additional training in Tunisia, the air echelon joined the ground echelon, which had previously departed from Camp Patrick Henry by Liberty Ship, at San Giovanni Airfield, west of Cerignola, Italy, and was assigned to Fifteenth Air Force.[citation needed] Although the group flew some interdiction and support missions, it engaged primarily in long range strikes against oil refineries. aircraft and munitions factories and industrial areas, harbors, and airfields.[2]

Flying from Italy, the group flew 243 missions on over 150 primary targets in Italy, Yugoslavia, Austria, Bulgaria, Hungary, Rumania, France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Greece, and Poland. During this time, 13,389.19 tons of bombs were dropped during 7,091 sorties on enemy marshalling yards, oil refineries, bridges, installations, airdromes, rail lines, etc.[3]

The 454th participated in the drive to Rome, the invasion of Southern France, and the defeat of Axis forces in northern Italy. The 454th was awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for similar action on the high priority Messerschmitt Aircraft Factory at Bad Voslau, Austria on 12 April 1944.[2][citation needed] It earned a second DUC for "outstanding performance of duty in armed conflict with the enemy" as a result of their mission against the Hermann Goering Steel Works in Linz, Austria on 25 July 1944.[2]

After the German Capitulation in May 1945, the 454th redeployed to the United States on 8 July. Many personnel were demobilized upon arrival at the port of debarkation a small cadre of key personnel was formed and the group was then established at Sioux Falls Army Air Field South Dakota in July and the unit was redesignated the 454th Bombardment Group, Very Heavy in July [2] and was equipped with B-29 Superfortresses and programmed for deployment to the Pacific Theater.

The Japanese Capitulation in August made the group redundant to Air Force requirements and the unit was inactivated on 17 October 1945.[2]


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Contents

Korean War [ edit ]

Continental Air Command established the 454th Troop Carrier Wing at Portland International Airport, Oregon in June 1952 to replace the 922d Reserve Training Wing, Ώ] which had taken over reserve activities at Portland following the mobilization of the 403d Troop Carrier Wing. It was equipped with Curtiss C-46 Commandos. Its activation as a reserve transport unit was short, as it was inactivated and its mission, personnel and equipment transferred to the 403d Troop Carrier Wing when the 403d was released from active duty in January 1953.

Strategic Air Command [ edit ]

4228th Strategic Wing

The origins of the assumption of the bombardment mission by the 454th began in 1955 when Strategic Air Command (SAC) took over Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, establishing the 4228th Air Base Squadron as a caretaker organization to prepare the base for use by strategic bombardment and air refueling units. ΐ] On 1 July 1958 the squadron expanded to a group and the 4228th Strategic Wing was organized and assigned to the 4th Air Division Α] to control the group and three maintenance squadrons. The wing's first operational squadron, the 901st Air Refueling Squadron, flying Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers, was activated a month later.

In March 1959, the 52d Aviation Depot Squadron was activated to oversee the wing's special weapons. The 4228th became fully organized on 15 June 1959 when the 492d Bombardment Squadron (BS), consisting of 15 Boeing B-52 Stratofortresses moved to Columbus from Carswell Air Force Base, Texas where it had been one of the three squadrons of the 7th Bombardment Wing. This was part of SAC's plan to disperse its strike force to reduce its vulnerability to a first strike by the Soviet Uniton. Starting in 1960, one third of the wing's aircraft were maintained on fifteen-minute alert, fully fueled and ready for combat to reduce vulnerability to a Soviet missile strike. Β] This was increased to half the wing's aircraft in 1962. Γ] The 4228th (and later the 454th) continued to maintain an alert commitment until the 454th was inactivated except for periods when the wing's aircraft were deployed to support operations in Southeast Asia. In 1962, the wing's bombers began to be equipped with the GAM-77 Hound Dog air-launched cruise missiles, The 4228th Airborne Missile Maintenance Squadron was activated in November to maintain these missiles

In 1962, in order to perpetuate the lineage of many currently inactive bombardment units with illustrious World War II records, Headquarters SAC received authority from Headquarters USAF to discontinue its Major Command controlled (MAJCON) strategic wings that were equipped with combat aircraft and to activate Air Force controlled (AFCON) units, most of which were inactive at the time which could carry a lineage and history. [note 1]

454th Bombardment Wing

As a result, the 4228th SW was replaced by the 454th Bombardment Wing, Heavy, Ώ] which assumed its mission, personnel, and equipment on 1 February 1963. [note 2] In the same way the 736th Bombardment Squadron, one of the unit's World War II historical bomb squadrons, replaced the 492d. The 858th Medical Group, 52d Munitions Maintenance Squadron and the 901st Air Refueling Squadron were reassigned to the 454th. Component support units were replaced by units with numerical designation of the newly established wing. Under the Dual Deputate organization, [note 3] all flying and maintenance squadrons were directly assigned to the wing, so no operational group element was activated. Each of the new units assumed the personnel, equipment, and mission of the units being discontinued.

The 454th Bomb Wing conducted air refueling operations and trained in bombardment operations. It converted to the B-52D in 1965 for Vietnam operations. Once operationally ready with the B-52D, the 454th wing headquarters, staff, tactical aircraft and crews and maintenance personnel were integrated into SAC's combat forces in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. Elements of the 454th Bombardment Wing completed more than 100 missions to South Vietnam without losing a single bomber to enemy aircraft fire. In May 1967 General Edward O. Martin assumed command of the 454th Bombardment Wing at Columbus, and one month later he led the wing on its second deployment to the Western Pacific area in support of Southeast Asia operations and returned to Columbus in December 1967. In May 1968 the 454th Wing made its third deployment to the Western Pacific area, its second under the command of General Martin.

Some upgraded B-52Cs were also transferred from the 99th Bombardment Wing during 1968 and 1969 and were operated as crew trainers.

By 1969 as the demand for pilots to support the war in Southeast Asia increased, the number of B-52s based stateside fell because they were needed overseas. At the same time, Minuteman and Polaris missiles were taking their places in strategic deterrence, replacing much of the bomber alert force. In addition, funds were also needed to cover the costs of combat operations. The 454th Bombardment Wing was inactivated on 2 July 1969 and its aircraft were reassigned to other SAC units. As part of the inactivation, Columbus Air Force Base was transferred to Air Training Command and resumed a pilot training mission.


Contents

Lineage

  • Constituted as 454th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on May 14, 1943
  • Allotted to the reserve. Activated on April 27, 1947
  • Established as 454th Troop Carrier Wing, Medium, on May 26, 1952
  • Redesignated 454th Bombardment Wing, Heavy on November 15, 1962

Assignments

    June 1 – July 31, 1943 July 31 – October 1943 October–December 1943
    August 1 – October 17, 1945
    , April 27, 1947 – May 1, 1951 June 13, 1952 – January 1, 1953 May 1 – June 16, 1951 November 15, 1962 – February 1, 1963

Components

  • 81st Bombardment Squadron, 1947–1951
  • 736th Bombardment Squadron 1943–1945, 1947–1951, 1952–1953, 1963–1969
  • 454th Troop Carrier Squadron 1952–1953
  • 737th Bombardment Squadron 1943–1945, 1947–1951, 1952–1953, 1963–1969
  • 738th Bombardment Squadron 1943–1945, 1947–1951, 1952–1953, 1963–1969
  • 739th Bombardment Squadron 1943–1945, 1947–1951 1963–1969

Stations

    , New Mexico June 1, 1943 , Arizona July 1, 1943 , Nebraska c. July 31, 1943 , South Carolina October 3 – December 1943 , Italy January 1944 – July 1945 , South Dakota August 1, 1945
    , Texas August 17 – October 17, 1945 , Washington, April 27, 1947 – June 27, 1949 , Washington, June 27, 1949 – June 16, 1951 , Oregon June 13, 1952 – January 1, 1953 , Mississippi, February 1, 1963 – July 2, 1969

Aircraft Flown

Operational History

World War II

Constituted as 454th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on May 14, 1943. Activated on June 1, 1943 at Davis-Monthan Field, near Tucson, Arizona. Training began immediately on B-24 Liberators and the Ground Cadre was sent on July 3 to Army Air Force School of Applied Tactics, Orlando AAB, Florida. On July 15, planes were sent from Davis-Monthan to join them at Pinecastle AAF, Florida for Practical Field Training.

From their bases in Florida, the Ground Echelon was transferred on July 28, 1943 to McCook Army Air Base near McCook, Nebraska and, on August 1, the Air Echelon joined them. This was the first operational unit to use the newly constructed McCook Air Base. On September 28 the Group was reassigned to Charleston AAB, Charleston, South Carolina

On December 2, 1943 the aircrews and some key ground personnel were sent to Mitchel Field, New York on December 2, 1943 in preparation for deployment overseas. These personnel were subsequently transferred to Morrison Field, near West Palm Beach, Florida and flew the southern route to North Africa. After additional training in Tunisia, the Air Echelon joined the Ground Echelon, who had previously departed from Camp Patrick Henry by Liberty Ship, at San Giovanni AAF, west of Cerignola, Italy, being assigned to Fifteenth Air Force.

Flying from Italy, the group flew 243 missions on over 150 primary targets in Italy, Yugoslavia, Austria, Bulgaria, Hungary, Rumania, France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Greece, and Poland. During this time, 13,389.19 tons of bombs were dropped during 7,091 sorties on enemy marshalling yards, oil refineries, bridges, installations, airdromes and rail lines.

Participated in the drive to Rome, the invasion of Southern France, and the defeat of Axis forces in northern Italy. The 454th was awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation for "outstanding performance of duty in armed conflict with the enemy" as a result of their mission against the Hermann Goering Steel Works in Linz, Austria on July 25, 1944. The Group received a second Unit Citation on May 24, 1945, for similar action on the high priority Messerschmidt Aircraft Factory at Bad Voslau, Austria on April 12, 1944.

On July 8, 1945, the 454th returned to the United States and was designated 454th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy), being programmed for reassignment to Twentieth Air Force and the invasion of Japan as a B-29 group. The end of the war in August led to the group's inactivation on October 17, 1945 and allocation to the reserve.

Korean War

The 454th was reactivated on April 27, 1947 at McChord Field, Washington and redesignated the 454th Bombardment Group (Medium), as part of the reserves and equipped with B-29s. The group was reassigned in July 1949 to Spokane AFB, Washington. The 454th was ordered into active service on May 1, 1951 and assigned to Strategic Air Command. It was inactivated on June 16, 1951 after personnel and equipment were reassigned to the 98th Bombardment Wing and deployed to Yokota AB, Japan as part of Far East Air Forces.

The 454th was redesignated as 454th Troop Carrier Group (Medium) at Portland Columbia Airport, Oregon and allocated to the reserve. Again activated on June 13, 1952, it was inactivated on January 1, 1953, being replaced by the 403d Troop Carrier Wing.


History [ edit | edit source ]

Activated as a B-26 Marauder medium bomber squadron trained under Third Air Force in the southeastern United States. Deployed to European Theater of Operations (ETO) assigned to VIII Bomber Command, 3d Bombardment Division in England. Engaged in combat operations over France and the Low Countries, attacking enemy military targets formations airfields railroads bridges and other raids to disrupt enemy defends. Coordinated raids with VIII Bomber Command heavy strategic bombardment of military and industrial targeted in Nazi Germany and in Occupied Europe by striking Luftwaffe day interceptor airfields to cause maximum disruption of air defenses when heavy bomber groups returning from bombardment raids. Destroyed many enemy aircraft on the ground destroyed support buildings barracks and enemy aircraft on the ground.

After D-Day invasion of Europe, engaged in tactical air support of Allied ground forces, carrying out bombardment attacks against enemy strong points, structures and targets of opportunity when making sweeps of enemy rear areas. Moved from England to Advanced Landing Grounds in France and further eastward as ground forces advanced across continent engaging enemy targets during the Western Allied invasion of Germany in early 1945. Continued combat operations until German capitulation in May 1945.

Became part of the United States Air Forces in Europe forces in Occupied Germany summer 1945. Demobilized in Germany in November and squadron inactivated as a paper unit in the United States.

Reactivated as a B-26 Invader reserve light bomber squadron in 1947. Trained in the reserves activated in 1951 due to the Korean War. Personnel and aircraft reassigned to units of Far East Air Force in South Korea squadron inactivated as a paper unit in the United States shorty afterward. Reactivated as a Tactical Air Command fighter squadron in 1955 inactivated in 1957 due to budget reductions Reactivated by Air Training Command as a navigator training squadron in 1972 inactivated with the closure of Mather AFB and the inactivation of its host unit in 1993.


454th Bombardment Group - History

27th BOMBARDMENT GROUP (LIGHT)

[27th Bomb Gp (L)]
[27th Bomb Group (L)]
[27th Bomber Group (Light)]

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Watch the video: More B-24s of the 454th Bombardment Group (May 2022).